To Thwart The Jihadist Insurgents

I would love to see Sufism in Afghanistan & Hinduism in India get a choke hold on the Wahhabi Movement in Pakistan & kill it.  Peace would be more likely in the region.  This is what I would most cherish after researching, reporting on, and poetically allying myself with Afghanistan for about a year now.

Most of the Christians out of the United States & Europe are getting out of the way & going home.  The Afghan National Army & Police & citizens of Afghanistan stay.  They stay & fight for their freedom & fledgling democracy.  They fight the Wahhabi-tainted & intolerant Taliban.  What’s going to take place in Afghanistan now will be, to say the very least, interesting ~ and, alas, bloody.

The religious connotations of the ongoing Afghanistan War, I believe, cannot be denied.  I believe matters of spirituality cannot be denied anywhere.  But I’ve never been to war as an individual, just a citizen of a nation gone to war.  Being an American, this is a common thing for my countrymen & me.

It will be nice ~ when the Taliban succumb to the efforts for peace & become monks somewhat like they were originally.  I’m sure most people don’t believe this will happen.  But I pray.

Old Timer Chronicle II, this blog, has been covering the Afghanistan War for a wee bit more than a year, from September, 2013, to October, 2014. Some research of the war’s earlier years has been included.  Sufism, a version of Islam popular amongst Afghans, is explored & Hinduism, out of India, is touched upon.  Some of St. Paul’s work represents Christianity on this blog.  Wahhabism, a blood-thirsty perversion of Islam,  can be explored on a link or two.  My favorite TV news commentators, Alex Wagner & Harris Faulkner, dropped by a few times via my shenanigans.

Today Old Timer Chronicle II has 90 subscribers.  It was removed from the wordpress.com forum some time ago.  By whom?  Why?  Maybe the NSA is doing its job protecting U.S. citizens, like myself, from blood-letting Jihadists.

Also, I wrote a narrative verse that consists of forty episodes entitled “Afghaneeland” in this issue of the Old Timer.  I’ve promoted it as Afghanistan’s new Iliad.  That makes me the Homer of Afghanistan.  Ain’t that somethin’?  I’ve never been there.

Among the characters that evolved out of my poetical efforts on this blog, thrives the young Afghan woman, Mamoodia.  She’s an idealistic, unrealistic, but promising, beautiful character, evolved out of Nuristan province.  Now she endures in the world of literature ~ to thwart unscrupulous Taliban ~ forever!

~

Young Afghan Mamoodia pulls an arrow out of her quiver

 ~

https://oldtimerchronicle2.wordpress.com/2014/05/08/a-new-breed-in-the-village

~

Yours truly

Rawclyde

!

Afghanistan’s Islamic Future

~~~

by Muhammad Amin Mudaqiq & Abubakar Siddique

Gandhara News & Analysis

May 19, 2014

~~~

As NATO troops wind down more than a decade of combat operations in Afghanistan, it is increasingly likely that some version of political Islam will be central to politics and governance in the country for the foreseeable future. Despite the violence that has marked Afghan Islamist factions in recent years, their inclusion may yet help pave the way to a more peaceful and stable Afghanistan.
.
For centuries, Afghans practiced a moderate version of Islam that emphasized religious observance but remained marginal to politics.  Islam was invoked to mobilize Afghans for empire building and defeating foreign invasions. Until a few decades ago, political Islam was not a source of extremism and violence.
.
The modern Islamist movement in Afghanistan emerged in response to the rise of communist factions in the 1960s and ’70s. Pakistan, Afghanistan’s eastern neighbor, tapped into the potential of this nascent force, which was led by students and teachers of Kabul University.
.
Islamabad’s support, Western backing, and communist persecution propelled the once marginal Muslim Youth Organization into a robust guerilla organization that resisted the Soviet invasion in the 1980s. Its leaders and members became holy warriors, or mujahedeen.
.
Once in power in Kabul after the fall of Afghan socialism in 1992, the mujahedeen evolved into factional warlords in a fratricidal civil war. What eventually emerged was the Taliban, a new breed of rural hardline Islamists.
.
The Taliban’s campaign to restore order in the mid-1990s attracted support in some Afghan regions, and they crushed most mujahedeen factions. However, they failed to deliver effective governance and were hijacked by Arab, Pakistani, and Central Asian extremists whose actions ultimately led to their downfall in late 2001.
.
Twelve years later, a mujahedeen-dominated Afghan government is struggling with a resurgent Taliban. To ensure future stability, these two major currents of Afghan Islamists will need to make peace. Additionally, Afghanistan’s leaders must reverse past mistakes of excluding Taliban factions in governance and give them a stake in the political process.
.
The international community can support these efforts by encouraging Kabul to engage former mujahedeen and the Taliban’s current leadership – at province, district, and tribal levels — and to enter a constructive peace process in governing Afghanistan together.
.
Economic and partisan stakes in the current political system coaxed former mujahedeen warlords to accept new roles as politicians and administrators. Similar incentives for Taliban leaders will considerably weaken their military zeal and prevent them from turning into jihadist proxies for Al-Qaeda or regional states.
.
Pakistan, too, plays a role. The imperative of domestic security must compel Islamabad to back intra-Afghan reconciliation wholeheartedly, and Pakistani leaders must deliver on recent promises to unequivocally back the elected Afghan government and refrain from supporting armed factions.
.
Inclusion and commitment to Afghanistan’s independence are not new concepts to the Taliban. Their literature indicates that while they are still committed to creating a more “Islamic” Afghanistan, the movement has abandoned moves to recreate an “Islamic Emirate” and no longer aspires to promote jihad across borders.
.
Taliban leaders now need to apply the lessons learned from Islamist movements elsewhere to chart their new path. Former mujahedeen enemies can convince the Taliban to strive for the implementation of Islamic laws through a peaceful political process, in the same way that many Pakistani lslamist political parties, whose leaders can be considered Taliban mentors, have publically shunned violence and entered into coalitions as a means to achieve their political goals.
.

The best way forward for Afghanistan’s Islamist factions is to the path to reconciliation. Indeed, many former Taliban leaders have already integrated into the Afghan political system by becoming lawmakers, governors, and peace negotiators. Hizb-e Islami, a separate insurgent faction, has largely been reintegrated into the new Afghanistan. The move into the political mainstream requires a commitment to peace and a desire to leave sanctuaries in Pakistan in return for a cooperative future in Afghanistan.

.In return, the Afghan government must accept that the Taliban cannot reinvent themselves unless past grievances are addressed and they are accepted as a political movement with legitimate aspirations. Establishing a robust judiciary will be key to enticing the Taliban, as justice is central to Islamic notions of governance. Following Afghanistan’s presidential elections in April, the new government should make creating a new judiciary a national priority.

.The future of Islamism in Afghanistan is fraught with challenges. But if handled properly, political Islam could instead become a mainstay of Afghan politics and a guarantor of stability. The political future of Afghanistan need not reflect its troubled past.

.Muhammad Amin Mudaqiq is the director of RFE/RL Radio Mashaal. Abubakar Siddique is an RFE/RL correspondent. The views are the authors’ own and do not represent those of RFE/RL

~~~

http://gandhara.rferl.org/content/article/25258834.html

~~~

Duty World By Rawclyde!

3ri4wmok5vwnl1t

~~~

I am an American who backs whatever choice the Afghan people make in regards to the government we’ve been nurturing in their country.  I believe in free will.  I do not believe in tyranny.  Taliban believe in tyranny.

Most Americans with whom I am acquainted know next to nothing about Afghanistan ~ the country in which the United States has been waging war for around 12 years.  The two countries have a relationship ~ but it could be better ~ much better.  As far as I am concerned, that better relationship begins right here with me.  At times it may not seem so, but I’m quite serious about this.  Just because we’re getting a divorce certainly doesn’t mean we have to be enemies.  However, that might occur if the Taliban end-up ruling in Afghanistan.  But that’s up to the citizens of Afghanistan.

April 5, 2014, about a week from now, an election is on that nation’s schedule to happen, more intense & important than any to which I’ve ever been privy.  Lot’s of people are dying.  I’m sorry about that.  The fighting, as observed from my perch on the other side of our planet, is fierce.  And it’s between the Afghans, nobody else, although each side has its own back-up & loyal & un-loyal tribes.  Somehow, the Afghan government & my government have made it this way.  And it’s about as fair as it can get.  It’s just too bad there’s so much bloodshed.  I blame that on the Taliban.

They are the sons of Afghanistan ~ but not the only sons of that country.  I back the Afghan National Army.  They are also sons (and daughters) of Afghanistan ~ and are democratic rather than tyrannical like their fierce but not fiercer opponents, the Taliban, who governed for a while but not right now.  Presently, if the Taliban want to govern they must run for election, campaign & be elected ~ or blow the whole thing to pieces if the rest of Afghanistan and its brand new army let’s them.  Also, I must add, if the Taliban do get elected sometime in the misty future, they’ve got to uphold a democratic rather than instigate a tyrannical rule, or, like the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt, they quite possibly won’t be ruling for but a few months.

The Taliban have nobody to blame but themselves for the presence of my countrymen & others in Afghanistan.  You don’t coddle the murderer of 3,000 American citizens on American soil (September 11, 2001) and likely get away with it.  The staunch and fierce Taliban are doomed as long as they are unwilling to compromise ~ and that’s how they appear to be ~ uncompromising.  I’ve read that at one time they were kind of like folk heroes.  But it looks to me now that nobody likes them, not even their own people.  If they think their own people are only Pashtun, I beg to defer.  Their people now include all the other Afghans too.  Sorry.

One last thing ~ the Taliban or any other extremist-group highjacking of the Islamic faith is not appreciated by the truly religious anywhere on Earth.  Go ahead & ask Benazir Bhutto, the Islamic prime minister twice of Pakistan who was assassinated, as she rolls in her grave with each murder that the misled Talibanee commit in her neighboring country as well as in her own.

~~~

new heros in town

Afghan National Army ~ new heroes in town

~~~

http://dutypoeticslab.yolasite.com/dreaming-about-the-infantry.php

~~~

Martial Integrity

A-10

~~~

by Rawclyde!

~~~

With the Republicans led by the nose by the Taliban Tea Party & the Democrats on a homosexual promotion binge, the United States has one last hope of assembling a little martial integrity.  This hope lay in Afghanistan.  Sell the A-10 Warthog Fleet to the Afghan National Army (ANA).

My hunch is that’s what the U.S. Secretary of Defense, Chuck Hagel, has in mind.  I hope he’s not too timid to pull it off.  Lately Hagel has been talking about downsizing the military and in doing so, eliminating the Warthog aeroplane fleet.  If this comes to be, we can sell the fleet for one dollar or so to the Afghan National Army who, with us leaving the premises, is in dire need of air support against the Taliban enemy out of Pakistan.  It could make the difference in the war.

Instead, it looks like Hamid Karzai, the president of Afghanistan, and Barack Obama, the U.S. president, are abandoning the ANA, which is a pity, a shame, and very possibly a mortal sin.  It looks like this is why MSNBC, the Democrat channel on American TV, has only been blathering about queers & a tub of lard in New Jersey & ignoring the Afghanistan War.

Maybe its too late for martial integrity.  Maybe it’s all in Pakistan.  Sometimes my personal paranoia taints my perspective.  Sometimes I don’t see too straight.  But, also, I am occasionally right on target.

imagesCAD4GVGE

Words & War

destroyed village in afghanistan

~~~

Words can be like bullets.  And bullets can be like words.  You might miss.  You might hit your target.  But a word is not a bullet.  And a bullet is not a word.  Bullets are made for killing.  Words are not.  Words are made to nick the heart.

Some people are old.  Some are young.  About half the people on our planet are women.  And the other half men.  If an old man & a young woman can talk to each other without screwing it up they’re doing pretty good.  I, myself, am an old man enthralled with wordcraft, not real familiar with bullets ~ engaged, involved, certainly superficially, probably not too deeply, but maybe, with a war on the other side of the planet.  It’s an intriguing semi-intellectual pursuit that can tug at an emotion or two now & then.  Words must be dished out, on occasion, with a grain of salt.  An unfortunate application of words can make a writer feel oh so wise and the next day feel oh so stupid.  Oh well.  And these damn words can make other people steaming mad or ~ or nothing at all.

Then there’s swimming pools with their shallow and deep ends, high boards and low boards on the deep ends.  I’ve never seen a diving board break.  Have you?  However, when very young I did some floundering in the deep end & could have drowned if somebody hadn’t pulled me out.  With words, when I begin to flounder in the deep end of a topic like war, please feel free, gentle & wise reader, to reach right in here & pull me out with a strategically placed “comment.”

War, I believe, is not pretty.  Peace is prettier.  A good looking woman is much easier to look at than some down & dirty war.  Wars are for avoiding & good for nothing.  Probably about 80-percent of the American people are in denial when it comes to the warring in Afghanistan in this year of 2014.  That’s most of the American people ~ yet our government by & for the people has been waging war way over there for 12 years.  Are the American people properly engaged in this often times ugly & tragic pursuit?  No.  Of course not.  We hate it.  Most Americans, I find, don’t like even talking about it.  When they do talk about it they’re likely to get extremely stupid.  Chances are they’ve never been to Afghanistan & sure as heaven & hell don’t understand that little war-torn nation about the size of ~ Texas?

Well.  Afghanistan and the United States have been mixing it up in one smoky relationship ~ hell-bent, fool-hardy, and full of crazed Taliban, brave villagers & urbanites, children, dubious elections, more Taliban & their rude friends, Al Qaeda leftovers, soldiers, courage, death, other nations, aid workers, a few more jobs, stolen money, endless debt, waste, and, I’ve read, the return of peace-loving Sufis back into the sunlight since the bully Taliban lost their job pretending to govern back in 2001.  And hopefully, we’re leaving.  Thirteen years is enough.  We’re getting a divorce.

Good bye, Afghanistan!

~ from Rawclyde!

~~~

afghan-munitions

~~~