Capt’n Fiddler’s Sufi Bubble

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~

War

What’s it good for?

Absolutely nothin

!

Afghaneeland Adventure Series | Old Timer Chronicle II

~

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8 thoughts on “Capt’n Fiddler’s Sufi Bubble

  1. the photos are expressive both the real-life dramas and the mythical – i like photos or anything that is visual. My on line eye sight is not always the best for reading long posts. I have only just received new computer glasses to help me combat computer glare. On my own blog, I always have my husband check it before posting due to eye-strain. What is the purpose of the post? do you do photography as a hobby? or are you interested in images that appeal? eve

    • I was a photo-journalist in the US Army for a few years and value a good picture. Lately I’ve been matching photos with verse. I find the photos and verse can compliment each other and rocket the symbolism in infinite directions. Although, if I’m not careful, the result is clutter…

      I’ll try not to do too many lengthy posts in order to nurture eye health…

      The purpose of the post, simply, is to promote the verse, which here, is not present. Not to mention, tell its own story… which will never be able to justify the suffering of the little girl in the last picture…

      Thank you, Eve.

      P.S. Since our conversation here, I added a few words at the bottom of the post…

    • This matching might be clarified by reading the Afghaneeland episodes which these pictures are promoting. You “liked” one of them, as I recall, entitled “Dervish Whirl.”

      The theme here involves Freedom. Freedom in Afghanistan. For women as well as everybody else there. You’re probably not missing anything. You also are most likely not forced to wear a burka. Maybe freedom nurtures strength. The photo arrangement most ideally illustrates this…

      • I am used to seeing woman in burkas – visiting India as I do, they are not new to me. Just another uniform forced upon people. I don’t like burkas but when you see them worn by women every day, you just get used to them. Having read the “bookselling of Kabul” and others, “The Kite Runners,” well, there’s not much more to want to know about this area of the world. Although at one time, Afghanistan was quite an advanced country, where women were well-educated and embraced by society. Seems like those days are gone. thanks eve

        • I hope those days are not gone. I hope they are on the way back. The present elections in Afghanistan, a three month ordeal, are very important in that respect, I think, for the Afghan people…

          I have not ever been around the burka in real life. I find it can be extremely attractive sometimes in photographs. I wonder a lot about the spiritual expansions in the wearing of it…

          • burkas?
            they are horrible garments on hot days.. but now i am off to bed. thanks so much for the conversation.

  2. In the final analysis, I don’t think we want to miss the plight of the little girl in the last picture. War ~ what’s it good for?

    Good night, E.D. And thank you for dropping by!

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