Jihad

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Holy War

For man to raise his sword against man, for man to kill man, is not holy war.  True holy war is to praise God and to cut away the enemies of truth within our own hearts.  We must cast out all that is evil within us, all that opposes God.  This is the war that we must fight.

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sufi-muhaiyaddeen

Muhammad Raheem Bawa Muhaiyaddeen

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from his book

Islam & World Peace

Explanations of a Sufi

1987

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My brethren, let me tell you a story so that you may better understand the meaning of jihad, or holy war.  When God formed Adam out of earth, He placed the great trust of the light of Nur Muhammad on Adam’s forehead and decreed that man would know things that the angels and other beings could never know.  The leader of the jinns was watching and listening.  He became filled with jealousy, pride, and vengeance, and these qualities changed him into satan.  At once he began to speak against God, boasting to Adam, “I am more exalted than you.  Allah said that He created you to be most exalted, but you are only made of earth.  I am made of fire.  If you bow down to me I will help you, but if you attempt to rise above me, then I will do many evil things to you and make you suffer greatly.”

Then that light on Adam’s forehead looked closely at satan, and when satan saw the radiance, there arose within him an even greater fear, jealousy, and vengeance.  Once again he sneered at Adam, “You are created out of mere earth, and yet you dare to look at me like this!  Because you were given a higher place than I was, I will create sorrow and suffering for you until the very end.”  Then satan spat on him, and the moment that spit landed on Adam, satan’s poisonous qualities entered him and spread throughout his entire body.  Those qualities became the darkness of the mind and the veils within the innermost heart.

Upon seeing what had happened, Allah commanded the Angel Gabriel to pinch out that spot of hell where satan’s spit had landed.  The hollow that remained became the navel.  Even though the spit itself was cleared away, some of the poison of those evil, envious qualities had already entered Adam and in that way were passed on to his descendents, causing all of mankind endless trouble.  Because of satan’s actions, Allah commanded that he and his followers be cast out of heaven.  Then he elevated Adam to the high position decreed for him.

This is a very great matter.  I have related only a small part of it to show you that the most important jihad, the holy war that each one of us must fight, is the war against these qualities.  Just as satan was thrown out of heaven because he opposed the Almighty, Unique One, we too must cast out all that is evil within us, everything that opposes God.  Those evil qualities of jealousy and vengeance are the qualities that ruin us and take us on the path to hell…

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faded salome

Salome by Henno Drop

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Growing Violence Against Aid Workers

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Voice of America News

November 30, 2013

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The United Nations says the recent violent deaths of nine aid workers in Afghanistan highlights the growing risks surrounding aid delivery and an increased disrespect for humanitarian personnel in the country.

Mark Bowden, the U.N. humanitarian coordinator in Afghanistan, says he is “extremely concerned” about the rise in violence, which comes as NATO coalition forces prepare to withdraw from the country next year.

In a Saturday statement, Bowden says the violence is taking place at a time when Afghanistan is in a “difficult transition” that could lead to increased humanitarian needs.

The U.N. says it has recorded 237 incidences against humanitarian workers, facilities and assets in Afghanistan this year, including 36 deaths.

On Wednesday, suspected Taliban gunmen killed six aid workers in the northern Faryab province. An explosive device killed three aid workers in the southern Uruzgan province the previous day.

An October report from the Aid Worker Security Database identified Afghanistan as the most dangerous country for these workers.

The database is compiled by Humanitarian Outcomes, a consulting team that provides data and policy advice to aid groups and donor governments.

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http://www.usaid.gov/afghanistan

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Ignoring Karzai’s Insults

an editorial by John Allen and Michael O’Hanlon

New York Times, November 28, 2013

Gen Allen US Marines

John Allen (left), a retired Marine Corps general and former commander of NATO and American forces in Afghanistan…  Michael O’Hanlon (not in photo) helped with the spelling…

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WASHINGTON — What is going on with President Hamid Karzai? The world’s only superpower, leading a coalition of some 50 nations, is willing to stay on in his country after a war that has already lasted a dozen years and cost the United States more than $600 billion and more than 2,000 fatalities — and yet the Afghan president keeps throwing up roadblocks.

The latest insult is his decision to hold off on signing a bilateral security agreement, the legal basis for American forces to remain in his country past 2014, on the grounds that his successor should have that prerogative next year. Mr. Karzai has also thrown in new demands — just when we thought the security agreement was a done deal. For one, he now seems to believe he can compel the United States to release all Afghan detainees in the prison camp at Guantánamo Bay.

Certainly, part of Mr. Karzai’s attitude comes from the umbrage he has taken at various Americans, especially in recent years. Some United States officials did make mistakes in their handling of the complex Afghan leader, lecturing him in public too stridently about matters such as Afghan government corruption. There can be little doubt, though, that Mr. Karzai’s own peevishness and ingratitude have played a large role.

In addition, Mr. Karzai believes, accurately perhaps, that the talks over the bilateral security agreement provide him with his last remaining leverage with Washington. He is wrong in thinking that Afghanistan remains a center of geopolitics, the location of a modern-day “great game” like the 19th-century competition between Britain and Russia, or the 1980s Cold War struggle pitting the Soviet Union against the United States and others. But Mr. Karzai is right that we are concerned enough about Afghanistan’s future to wish to maintain a presence even after NATO’s combat mission expires in just 13 months. He also rightly perceives that the United States wants to keep a vigilant eye on extremist groups in tribal regions of northwest Pakistan.

Against this backdrop, American officials should stay calm. It would be a mistake to let one man — increasingly detached from Afghan public and political opinion — determine the fate of the American role in South Asia. Even with Osama bin Laden dead, the stakes remain high: Extremist groups from Al Qaeda to Lashkar-e-Taiba (the Pakistani group responsible for the 2008 Mumbai terror attack) could easily put down roots again in Afghanistan if the country were to fall to the Taliban after NATO’s departure.

The recent assembly of Afghan tribal elders, a loya jirga, again demonstrated what we already knew — that the Afghan people want us to stay. After the defeat of the Soviets in 1989, civil war, state collapse and Taliban victory followed. The Afghan people have seen this movie already; they do not want the sequel. The loya jirga urged Mr. Karzai to sign the agreement; he demurred.

The main candidates in Afghanistan’s 2014 presidential election also want us to stay. A poll by the Moby Group in Kabul, Afghanistan’s largest private media organization, suggests that the two leading contenders are former Foreign Minister Abdullah Abdullah and former Finance Minister Ashraf Ghani. Both are pro-Western; both are smart and competent. The same is true of Foreign Minister Zalmay Rassoul, said by some to be President Karzai’s choice to succeed him after elections in April. Other candidates also support a continuing American and international presence.

So the United States should stay patient. It can say to Mr. Karzai, If you want to reinforce Afghan democracy by letting your successor sign this security deal, we can live with that; in the meantime, working with your ministers and other leaders, we will plan on staying — precisely as if the accord were already in place.

Of course, the United States can make contingency plans; it would need a Plan B in any event. Even as it anticipates alternate scenarios, it can continue discussions with Mr. Karzai on the other “conditions” that he has just introduced. For American leaders, we counsel patience and flexibility in the talks on a security deal.

Let us remember the girls who can go to school — an affront to the Taliban — and the Afghan women who are increasingly emerging as an important factor in the future of their country. Let’s remember, too, the ethnic minorities who have found a place and their voice in a modern, forward-looking Afghanistan.

And finally, let’s not forget the progress purchased so dearly in this decade and more of war. We must not permit Mr. Karzai’s pique to flush all this down the drain.

The United States can ride this one out. And given the enduring American strategic interests in this part of the world, as well as our huge sacrifice, that’s exactly what we should do.

In the end, this is about the American and the Afghan peoples, not about Hamid Karzai.

boy-donkey2

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